What all the wise men promised would happen has not happened and what all the damned fools said would happen has come to pass (Lord Melbourne)

The other day the Department for work and pensions (DWP) quietly published a report on the first five months (April-August 2013) of the working of the bedroom tax. There are problems with the report (as discussed excellently by Joe Halewood here) but it found a minimal number of social rent tenants had downsized in the social rent sector, extremely few had moved into the private rented sector, a fifth of tenants had paid not a penny of the shortfall in rent caused for them by the bedroom tax benefit cut, and those tenants who had paid all or some were cutting back on some essentials.

It wasn’t supposed to be like that. No wonder the DWP put out the report as the Cabinet reshuffle filled the news.

What was it supposed to be like?

First, let me remind you that Tories and Libdems (with very few Libdem exceptions) backed the introduction of the bedroom tax to the hilt and in the face of clear monitory advice that the ill-effects that have indeed come to pass would do so. The Tory Libdem government were obdurate about the tax, including the difficulties it would cause to adult disabled people, while shouting it was fair, that fuzziness so loved by Libdems.

The Huffington Post has a scarring record of Nick Clegg’s support for the tax on eight occasions.

The Tories and Libdems said the tax would persuade social rent tenants living in a house deemed too large for their needs would move into a smaller house. Opponents pointed out there were not enough smaller houses; this policy would not happen; it hasn’t, it turns out that there are not enough smaller houses.

Opponents pointed out the difficulties that would be caused to adult disabled tenants; the Tories and Libdems ploughed on; and the difficulties have indeed happened.

Opponents warned of serious financial difficulties with an impact on their everyday lives would be caused to tenants already poor; the Tory Libdems persisted while crying fairness; the adverse impacts have happened.

The numbers affected by the tax are problematic and the promised savings have not come about.

Libdems and the bedroom tax

The Libdem party has said the tax should be radically changed. This is hardly a response to surprise evidence: the DWP report covers only the first five months of the tax and the adverse impacts were well rehearsed before it came into force. No, this is more a Westminster than a Damascus conversion: Libdem policy is now influenced by 6 May 2015, the next general election. Having spent four years up to their elbows in reactionary Tory policies, Libdems now wish us to believe they are not Tories: the Land Registry will not be privatised, nor tuition fee loans, the wisdom of 6 May.

The damaging reorganisation and privatisation of the NHS, free schools, tuition fees, abolition of the farmworkers pay board, hit-the-poor welfare changes … Libdems voted for all these. The Libdems were also at the heart of the sell off of part of Royal Mail for what amounts to a £1 billion loss to the taxpayer.

Cornwall MPs and the bedroom tax

The record is brutal. Andrew George (Libdem St Ives) has consistently opposed the tax and he has a private member’s bill that will repeal it. (He has also opposed several of the other toxic Tory Libdem policies.)

For how Stephen Gilbert and Dan Rogerson (Libdem, St Austell and Newquay; North Cornwall) have voted on the bedroom tax see my post Cornwall Libdem MPs support-oppose-who-knows bedroom tax (14 February 2014). The three Tory MPs have backed it.

I just watch

Well, I think it’s going to be fun reading what the Libdem party says now the election draws close. As Will Rogers very nearly said: I don’t make jokes. I just watch the Liberal Democrats and report the facts.

Notes
Lord Melbourne (William Lamb): 1779-1848, Whig/Liberal prime minister

Will Rogers: 1879-1935, USA political comedian etc


There have just been two by-elections for Cornwall Council in the last week: in Illogan and in Mabe, Perranworthal, and St Gluvias. I’m focusing on the performance of Mebyon Kernow (MK), the nationalist party that brands itself as “the party for Cornwall”, because of the overblown self-description, the absurd characterisation of other parties, and because it has a political nationalist agenda for Cornwall.

The full results are here.

In Illogan MK came second and got 217 votes. Commendable, but it is only 6.0 percent of the electorate, that is the eligible voters. Last year in the main unitary elections MK got 290 votes, 7.7 percent. In Mabe etc this week MK came fifth and got 58 votes, 1.3 percent of the electorate. Last year it did not contest the seat. In both seats MK had good candidates.

I have used electorate figures because I think they best show the enthusiasm, or lack of it, of people for parties and their policies and offer a perspective on ideas of representativeness and mandate. The Tories have said a trade union should get at least 50 percent of its electorate voting in a strike ballot; neither in Illogan nor Mabe did turnout reach that. Anyway, add these votes up and this month MK has got 275 votes. That’s 3.45 percent of the two electorates. The results are a signal failure to rally people to the nationalist cause, a demonstration that there is not widespread and enthusiastic support for MK, a rejection by the people of Cornwall of the MK agenda. MK may call itself the party for Cornwall but it is the party Cornwall doesn’t want.

Note that the best any party did in share of electorate in these two by-elections was just over 9 percent.

I have been kind to MK. There has been another Cornwall Council by-election since the May 2013 unitary election. This was in Wadebridge. How did MK do? It didn’t. It didn’t contest the seat. I have excluded its 0.0 percent here from the total results; throw that in the pot and MK’s proportion sinks further but let’s gently leave it at 3.45 percent.


The debate around devolution to a Cornwall assembly has shifted. As I have argued previously Mebyon Kernow (MK) languishes in yesterday’s England and should drop its claim of Cornish uniqueness on this and other questions and drag itself into the real debate about a general devolution within England.

Mainstream progress
The other day Andrew Adonis added to the momentum of devolution within England and presented Labour’s argument for such a devolution. All the major parties – Conservative, Liberal Democrat, and Labour – are now agreed about devolving powers to major cities in England. It has already begun and will spread to populous areas outside the cities, including to groups of counties. Of course, we must hold the hands of the parties to the fire of local devolution in England but also be aware of the problems that localism brings.

Frankly, while nationalists played with blueprints for a separatist assembly, the mainstream politicians and parties quietly worked on a general devolution throughout England. What happens in Cornwall will happen within these general moves in England. It will be interesting to see how MK responds, whether it places itself within the devolution-in-England movement or remains impotently outside.

Only 1 in 300 back assembly petition
Meanwhile, notice that when I looked today the MK online petition for a “legislative Cornish assembly” has got 2453 signatures since late November, half of them by the end of the year. However, six of the ten latest signatures displayed on the website were from outside Cornwall, indeed one from outside Britain. There are about 425 000 adults in Cornwall; assuming half of the signatories live in Cornwall, that’s about 0.3 percent of our adult population, one in three hundred, signing. This political nationalist cause does not command widespread support. Andrew George, Libdem MP for St Ives, who came first in the House of Commons draw ballot for private members’ bills, was wise not to pursue a Cornish assembly bill.

Other posts

Comment on the city deal project 30 October 2012

First set of city deals 5 July 2012

Meanwhile, in the Commons this (Hansard 19 November 2013 columns 870 and 871) and this (column 1074) about Cornwall, devolution, and city deals.

Empowering Cornwall 8 March 2012

How should Cornwall be governed? 24 October 2009


Good news about the living wage. Camborne town council decided on 12 June 2014 to pay the living wage from next April.

The council is a very small employer and the effect on its budget is minor but I congratulate the council on making a decision for social justice. Minute particulars, as Blake said.

Warm congratulations to Robert Webber, the Labour councillor who proposed the town council move to a living wage.

Slowly the living wage is establishing across Cornwall. There is a way to go: see this post for a sense of the task. However, the direction is positive.

Notes and previous posts

Minute particulars: William BLAKE (1757-1827) Jerusalem:
“Labour well the Minute Particulars…
He who would do good to another must do it in Minute Particulars.”

Living wage hallelujah 5 May 2014

Paid less than the living wage in Cornwall: how many and where 1 April 2014

Cornwall and the decency threshold 7 November 2013

Penzance town council, a living wage employer 29 October 2013

Cornwall Council and the living wage 16 August 2013

Living wage for Cornwall 22 July 2013

Cheers, Jude Robinson 29 October 2012

A proper Cornish wage 10 May 2012

Progress to a living wage 29 June 2011

A living wage for Cornwall 17 May 2011

The pro-Cornish wage 31 August 2010


Tony Gueterbock (lord Berkeley) has introduced another bill about the duchy of Cornwall into the House of Lords. The best way in is through the explanatory notes (pdf) explanatory notes.

The earlier Berkeley bill, the Rights of the sovereign and duchy of Cornwall bill, has fallen away. This bill (Duchy of Cornwall bill) had its first reading on 10 June 2014. It makes the eldest child of the monarch, regardless of gender, duke of Cornwall, requires the duchy estate to pay income and capital gains tax, and removes various exemptions and privileges of the duchy.

The bill is well founded, though it deals with both constitutional issues such as succession and estate issues such as tax; it should be enacted; but won’t be. However, I hope Berkeley keeps at it and slowly timid and deferential government might see the point of reform.

Earlier posts
Duchy bill rumbles on 9 November 2013
Curate’s egg duchy bill 16 April 2013
Gender-blind duchy of Cornwall 2 March 2013
Curate’s egg duchy bill 16 April 2013
Future of the duchy of Cornwall 7 June 2012


CORNWALL DATA

13 June 2014

CLICK FOR LATEST ADDED Unemployment: JSA claimants in Cornwall May 2014 and Population in Cornwall including electors

In this ongoing post I bring together data about Cornwall from various sources so that it is more readily accessible. Much is already posted at scattered places on this blog of course. All the data refers only to Cornwall and its parts (and sometimes includes and sometimes excludes the Isles of Scilly). Sources are given in square brackets; I have also included some website addresses, though these may change, so that you can explore the data for yourself. Explanatory notes with the original data are important for understanding.


CLICK INDEX
Abortions |Affordable housing |Antidepressant prescribing | Average pay |Bedroom tax in Cornwall |Benefit costs in Cornwall |Cancer services | Children born in Cornwall | Civil partnerships registered in Cornwall |Classroom assistants in Cornwall schools | Cornwall Council pay | Cornwall Council employment | Cornwall disability services cuts | Council tax arrears in Cornwall | Council tax benefit recipients in Cornwall | Cornwall MPs’ expenses and allowances | Cornwall health spending | Deprivation in Cornwall |Education maintenance allowance(EMA) | Electors in Cornwall | Empty dwellings | Free school meals | Fuel poverty | GDP AND GVA | Housing benefits | House repossessions | Housing waiting lists | Landfill in Cornwall | Land use in Cornwall | Life expectancy in Cornwall | Looked-after children in Cornwall | Miscellaneous | National lottery in Cornwall | Not in education, employment, or training | Pensioners in Cornwall | Place survey 2008 | Population of Cornwall | Pupil funding | Pupil premium in Cornwall | Religion in Cornwall at 2011 census | School place appeals in Cornwall | Schoolteachers | Second homes | Smoking mothers in Cornwall | Social class in Cornwall | Sure Start | Teenage pregnancies in Cornwall | Unemployment: JSA claimants | Uncollected domestic and non-domestic local taxes | University College Falmouth: socio-economic background of students |Water and sewerage bills | Wind farm capacity factor in Cornwall 2009 |

ABORTIONS
The Department of Health annually publishes abortion statistics for England and Wales.

For the area of the Cornwall clinical commissioning group (NHS Kernow) there were 1161 abortions in 2012 (Table 10a), a rate of 13.3 per 1000 women resident here aged 15-44 (see Table 10a here. For England for 2012 the rate was 16.6 per 1000 (Table 10b).

AFFORDABLE HOUSING
In 2012/13 745 additional affordable dwellings were provided in Cornwall. These were made up of: 159 for social rent, 153 for affordable rent, 21 for intermediate rent, and 421 for affordable purchase in Department for works and pensions table 1011 (https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-affordable-housing-supply).

ANTIDEPRESSANT PRESCRIBING
Number of antidepressant items prescribed per GP practice in Cornwall per 1000 people (third quarter 2012/13: 185-225, that is the third quartile where the first quartile is least prescriptions in England). Source: Focus on: antidepressant prescribing(Nuffield Trust and Health Foundation, May 2014)

AVERAGE PAY
£22 246 at April 2013, (median, annual, gross, fulltime, all workers, by Cornwall residence; the England comparative median was £27 375. [ONS, ASHE 2013, Table 8.7a]. The annual mean average pay (gross, fulltime, all workers by Cornwall residence, Table 8.7a) was £26 239.

There are various ways of measuring average pay, eg mean and median average, male and female and both, fulltime and part time, by place of work and by place of residence, by local authority and by constituency, weekly pay and annual pay. Figures for median average pay tend to be less than for mean average.

ASHE Annual survey of hours and earnings here .

BEDROOM TAX/SPARE ROOM SUBSIDY IN CORNWALL

The updated (February 2014) figures for the bedroom tax in Cornwall as at November 2013 are:
Total number of claimants of housing benefit: 43 093
Claimants whose social rent housing benefit has been reduced: 2729
Average weekly benefit reduction: £13.51
(The reduction is applied only to relevant tenants in social housing. Housing benefit claimants are 21 152 tenants in private housing and 21 946 in social housing. The totals do not sum because of rounding.) SOURCE: Housing benefit caseload statistics December 2013

BENEFIT COSTS IN CORNWALL
In 2011/12 the costs (in £millions) of various benefits and allowances in Cornwall were:
Total £1479.4 million, made up of -
Attendance allowance £ 55.1 million, Bereavement/widows benefit 5.1, Carers allowance 16.4, Council tax benefit 46.5, Diability living allowance (DLA) 121.0, Employment and support allowance (ESA) 31.4, Housing benefit 178.0, Incapacity benefit 46.2, Income support 54.3, Job seekers allowance (JSA) 30.4, Pension credit 83.0, Severe disablement allowance 8.0, State pension 780.1, Winter fuel payments (WFP) 24.0. The total of these figures is in England 2011/12 was £131803 million. SOURCE Department of work and pensions (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/benefit-expenditure-by-local-authority).

CANCER SERVICES
The second annual report on some cancer services and outcomes was published by the Department of Health on 1 December 2009. It includes data for Cornwall and Isles of Scilly primary care trust and the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust (RCHT) on pages 29, 46, and 67.

CHILDREN BORN IN CORNWALL
The ONS publishes the details for England and Wales of the numbers of live births to mothers who themselves were born in the United Kingdom or born outside the United Kingdom in each year. The figures for Cornwall (excluding the Isles of Scilly), with much lower percentages than for England as a whole, for the first and last years of the series are:

2008: 5423 live births, 92.4 percent of which were to mothers born inside the UK
2001: 4463 live births, 94.5 percent of which were to mothers born in the UK.

In 2010 there were 5558 live births in Cornwall: see table 1a ONS here.

The data is in tables 3a-3h on this ONS website which also gives separate figures for each of the former districts in Cornwall. [ONS]

CIVIL PARTNERSHIPS REGISTERED IN CORNWALL
Civil partnerships became possible in Britain with the coming into force of the Civil Partnership Act 2004 on 5 December 2005.

Civil partnerships registered in Cornwall by year:
2005: none
2006: 160
2007: 85
2008: 62
2009: 69
2010: 60
2011: 71
2012: 77
Sources: Lords Hansard 6 June 2011 column WA 15-16 (for years 2005-09) and ONS Civil partnership formations, Table 3.1 (for years 2008-2011)

CLASSROOM ASSISTANTS IN CORNWALL
At November 2012 there were 2462 fulltime classroom assistants in Cornwall schools [Hansard 2 Sepember 2013 column 65W]

CORNWALL COUNCIL EMPLOYMENT
The number of people employed by Cornwall Council was 20 994 (31 December 2009) and 16 367 (30 September 2011) [Graham Smith's blog 20 January 2012 here.]

CORNWALL COUNCIL PAY
Some details of the total pay of the council’s employees getting at least £100 000 pa are summarised in Town hall rich list by the Taxpayers Alliance, 17 March 2011. Table 3 shows thirty two employees of Cornwall Council getting £100 000 pa or more in remuneration, including employer’s pension contributions, in 2009/10. This makes Cornwall, with Newcastle on Tyne, the council with the highest number of employees over this benchmark for the year.

CORNWALL DISABILITY SERVICES CUTS
A survey by Demos and Scope of how 152 local authorities in England are handling cuts to disability services puts Cornwall Council at 11th out of 152 (where 1st is best).

CORNWALL HEALTH SPENDING
In 2011-2012 the total revenue funding of Cornwall and Isles of Scilly (CIOS) primary care trust is £916.136 million. This is an increase of 3.1 percent over 2010-2011. The CIOS percapita funding is £1687 pa for 2011-2012. For England trusts as a whole the percapita spending is £1693, an increase of 3 .0 percent over 2010-2011. [See Department for health Exposition book 2011-2012. (scroll to the Exposition book). Also seeHansard 5 April 2011 column829W for net data.]

CORNWALL MPS’ EXPENSES AND ALLOWANCES

These are now published by the Independent parliamentary standards authority (IPSA) here.

COUNCIL TAX ARREARS IN CORNWALL

At 31 March 2011 the total outstanding council tax arrears in Cornwall was
£12 877 000 [DEP2012-1047 of 25 June 2012]

COUNCIL TAX BENEFIT RECIPIENTS IN CORNWALL

At March 2012 the number of council tax benefit recipients in Cornwall was 54 170 (April 2011: 52 490). At January 2011 the recipients by Cornwall constituency were:
Camborne and Redruth 9760. North Cornwall 8130. South East Cornwall 7810. St Austell and Newquay 9870. St Ives (including Isles of Scilly) 9200. Truro and Falmouth 7800. [ DWPAdditional tables, updated regularly]

DEPRIVATION IN CORNWALL
There are several ways of measuring deprivation. The Indices of multiple deprivation (IMD) are a major one.

The IMD of 2007 show Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly at 69th out of 142 ‘counties, cities, and London boroughs’ in England, where 1st is the most deprived. The IMD puts the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly primary care trust (CIOS) area at 74th out of 152 trust areas where 1st is the most deprived.The IMD of 2010 show Cornwall unitary authority at 110 out of 326 local authorities (rank of average score).

The IMD 2007 give these results for the former districts of Cornwall out of 354 districts in England, the score 1st is the most deprived: Penwith 36th, Kerrier 86th, Restormel 89th, North Cornwall 96th, Carrick 120th, and Caradon 156th. The IMD 2010 do not include the former districts of Cornwall, by then abolished.

IMD deprivation varies vastly across Cornwall and the measurements for 32 482 subwards in England which are available show this clearly.

See the IMD 2007 here. The IMD 2010 are here [new addresses as the former DCLG ones no longer work]

The Health Observatory website here has some deprivation data for Cornwall too. Also look at the data above for free school meals in Cornwall.

The estimate of the End Child Poverty campaign for mid-2010 was that 19 percent of children in Cornwall live in poverty, below the England average: read their definition. Data for Cornwall wards is given.

EDUCATION MAINTENANCE ALLOWANCE
At August 2011 there were 7647 recipients of the England education education allowance (EMA) in Cornwall. This is for 16-18 year olds to encourage them to stay on at school or college. EMA has since been abolished. [Source: Young people's learning agency]

See this post of 27 January 2012 for details of the England bursary scheme and the Cornwall bursary scheme.

EMPTY DWELLINGS
There were 9522 empty dwellings in Cornwall at 5 October 2010. Figures for previous years were October 2009: 9407; October 2008 for the six districts: 9012. [Hansard 14 May 2009 columns 998W-999W; Empty Homes Agency]

FREE SCHOOL MEALS
Eligibility for free school meals is an indication of income deprivation and is an influence on educational achievement.

Percentage of primary and nursery pupils eligible for free school meals, January 2011:
England 18.0 (2010: 17.3)
Cornwall 14.1 (2010: 13.0)

Percentage of secondary pupils eligible for free school meals, January 2011:
England 14.6 (2010: 14.2)
Cornwall 10.8 (2010: 10.3)
[Scroll on the Education department web page to the
free school meals tables
.]

The relationship of eligibility for free school meals and not gaining any GCSEs above grade D is given in DEP 2009-0918 of 19 March 2009 (Parliamentary Library).

Also see the data for deprivation below.

The percentage of pupils in individual schools eligible for free school meals at January 2009 is given in the Parliamentary Library deposited papers at DEP 2010-0089 for 11 January 2010. Cornwall LA number on the data sheet is 908.

FUEL POVERTY
The Department of energy and climate change (DECC) publishes data for households in fuel poverty. There are statistics for the numbers of households in fuel poverty for the six constituencies and 327 subwards in Cornwall in 2010.

Fuel poverty is defined as having to spend more than ten percent of income on a satisfactory heating regime: more details on the DECC website.

In Cornwall as whole in 2009 around 60 000 households were classed as in fuel poverty, about 26 percent of all households; in 2010 the figures were 44 706 and 19.1 percent.

GDP AND GVA
The latest GVA data for Cornwall and the Scillies was published by the ONS on 14 December 2011. Cornwall GVA perhead, current prices by workplace, was £13 129 in 2009. (£13 256 in 2008, £12 681 in 2007) which is 65.6 percent of the UK mean average (64.5 percent in 2008, 63.6 percent in 2007). Details from the ONS for 2009 are here (NUTS 2 subregions).

HOUSING BENEFIT RECIPIENTS IN CORNWALL

At March 2012 there were 42 680 recipients of housing benefit in Cornwall (April 2011: 40 590). At January 2011 numbers of recipients by constituency were:
Camborne and Redruth 7310. North Cornwall 6060. South East Cornwall 5910. St Austell and Newquay 8120. St Ives (including the Isles of Scilly) 7070. Truro and Falmouth 6070. [ DWP Additional tables, updated regularly]

In July 2010 there were 39 710 people in Cornwall claiming housing benefit of which 12 840 received local housing allowance, the housing benefit for people not in social/council housing but private rented accommodation. Note that the recipients are ‘benefit units’ who might be a single person or a couple. [Table 2 in DEP2010-1938 of 4 November 2010 in House of Commons library]

HOUSE REPOSSESSIONS
There was a total of 820 orders for mortgage and landlord repossessions in Cornwall (unitary authority and the Isles of Scilly) in 2011. The figure for martgage repossession orders only was 360. [Ministry of Justice: http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/statistics-and-data/civil-justice/mortgage-possession.htm%5D

In 2011/12 there were 505 mortgage repossession claims in Cornwall and the rate of repossession claims in Cornwall was 2.4 per 1000 houses; Cornwall was 235th out of 324 England local authorities (where 1 is worst). [Shelter]

HOUSING WAITING LISTS At the end of August 2013 were were about 28 600 households on the Cornwall unitary council housing waiting list. At 1 April 1997 there were 8124. The details from the Department of communities, by district and by years 1997-2012, are in Table 600 here. There are statistics for both the current Cornwall unitary authority and the former shire county. Read the explanation of the figures at the foot of the table. The current Cornwall details are here.

LANDFILL IN CORNWALL
Cornwall 2007/08:
Total municipal waste 324 480 tonnes
Total municipal waste sent to landfill 210 386 tonnes (64.84 percent of total municipal waste)
The average proportion of municipal waste sent to landfill for the 121 unitary and waste disposal authorities in England was 54.42 percent.
[Hansard 26 October 2009 column 50W-54W]

LAND USE IN CORNWALL
Details of land use in Cornwall are available for the six former districts and for wards. The categories are given in square metres for domestic buildings, nondomestic buildings, domestic gardens, roads, rail, paths, greenspace, water, other, and unclassified. The tables are at Census ward levels GLUD 2005 tables. GLUD means Generalised land use database. An explanatory document of the GLUD statistics is here.

LOOKED-AFTER CHILDREN IN CORNWALLAT 31 March 2012 there were 480 (to nearest five) children under eighteen who were in the care of Cornwall local authority. Figures for England were 67 050 (to nearest ten). The data is in Table LAA1 here and covers several past years.

LIFE EXPECTANCY IN CORNWALL
Life expectancy at birth in Cornwall 2009-2011: males 79.2 years, females 83.3 years (England: males 78.9, females 82.9). Cornwall ranks 57 out of 150 local authorities for both male and female life expectancy where 1 is best [ONS, 'Healthy life expectancy at birth for upper tier local authorities']. Healthy life runs at about 80 percent of the total years of life expectancy.

MISCELLANEOUS
Statistics for Cornish towns is a booklet produced by the Office of National Statistics (ONS). The revised version is dated September 2009. It contains data about deprivation, the number and size of businesses, unemployment, and population. Read it through the South West Observatory here.The South West Observatory website also has other data.

South West Regional Development Agency (SWRDA) (now abolished) published in October 2009 Economic profile: issue 8 which discusses Cornwall’s economy in the recession on pages 20-25. Read it here.

NATIONAL LOTTERY IN CORNWALL
Since the National Lottery began in 1995 and up to September 2011, £265.745 million has been distributed in Cornwall.
Source: Department for culture, media, and sport

NOT IN EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, OR TRAINING
The number of young people aged 16-24 in Cornwall who are not in education, employment, or training (NEETS) was 6000 for January-December 2009. This was 12 percent of the age group. The Cornwall percentage is the 23rd lowest of the 148 local authorities listed. For the reliability of the figures, see the original. [Hansard 20 July 2010 column 303W]

PENSIONERS IN CORNWALL
There are about 137 000 old age pensioners in Cornwall (males aged 65 and over, females 60 and over, mid-2010). The full figures, including for both the county and the former districts, are in this zip file on the ONS website. [ONS]

PLACE SURVEY
A survey in 2008 by the Department for Communities and Local Government looked at people’s views of the locality and local services. Question 5 asked people how strongly they felt they belonged to their immediate neighbourhood. In the Cornwall area 66.5 percent said fairly or very strongly. This was 53rd out of 353 council areas, the largest percentage being at number 1.
[Department of Communities and Local Government Place survey 2008]

POPULATION OF CORNWALL INCLUDING ELECTORS
The estimated population of Cornwall, excluding the Isles of Scilly, at the 2011 census (27 March 2011) was 532 273.
There are various counts of people in Cornwall.

Census and mid-year estimates
2011 census: 532 273 (Table PO7)
About 430 000 (81 percent) were aged eighteen or over but see Electoral register.
Mid-year estimate 2012: 537 914

Electoral register
The Office for national statistics (ONS) has published electoral register statistics. They are up to date up to February 2014.
Cornwall local government electors: 409 639
Cornwall parliamentary electors: 406 887

(Parliamentary electors in Camborne and Redruth 64 769, North Cornwall 63 718, South East Cornwall 68 570, St Austell and Newquay 73 808, St Ives 65 736, Truro and Falmouth 70 286).

Patients registered with GPs in Cornwall and Isles of Scilly(Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group)
Clinical commissioning group population 2012: 555 917

Notes
All the electoral register figures include attainers, that is electors who attain the age of eighteen in the months after the compilation of the register.

The mid-year resident population aged 18 and over includes everyone whereas the electoral register includes only those eligible to vote and thus excludes some foreign citizens for example; people who move away are removed from the register but this may not be instantaneous.

The number of GP patients in England has regularly exceeded the population every year since 1961.

Reasons for excess population on GP lists are given here: some patients are registered with more than one practice, some have more than one NHS number, some patients remain on the list after they have died or moved abroad, and the effectiveness of the removal of ex-patients varies.

PUPIL FUNDING
The per-pupil dedicated schools grant (DSG) for 2011-12 includes various other grants and is now known as GUFS, guaranteed units of funding. For 2011-12 GUFS include the 2010-11 DSG at the same cash level plus the other grants. For 2011-12 Cornwall per pupil GUF is £4663.54, made up of £4042.72 DSG 2010-11 and £620.82 other relevant 2010-11 grants.

Details are here at the excel file GUFS 2011-12.

In terms of per pupil funding for 2011-12 Cornwall is 134th out of 151 authorities (that is at the 12th percentile); seventeen authorities have lower GUF funding than Cornwall. The average England per pupil GUF 2011-12 is £5082.53. Any pupil premium for individual pupils and students is additional to GUF.

The dedicated schools grant (DSG) began in 2006/07 and earlier per pupil allocations are not directly comparable. Before 2006/07 schools were funded largely through the formula grant which, apart from the DSG, is the main grant from central government to local authorities.

PUPIL PREMIUM IN CORNWALL
The pupil premium began in 2011/12. It has three components for deprivation (broadly eligibility for free school meals); military service children; looked-after children.In 2012/13 the amounts for each pupil were increased and the eligibility for the deprivation component was widened.

In 2011/12 10 690 pupils in Cornwall state-funded schools, including academies, qualified for a pupil premium with a total funding of £4.741 million; that is, 16.4 percent of all pupils in those schools. In 2012/13 the provisional figure is 16 050 pupils (24.6 percent) and £9.049 million. [ Department for Education]

RELIGION IN CORNWALL AT 2011 CENSUS
The 2011 census in table QS210EW gave the following: Christians 318 357, 59.8 percent of the population of Cornwall; Other religions 9480, 1.8 percent; No religion 159 080, 29.9 percent; Religion not stated 45 356, 8.5 percent.

SCHOOL PLACE APPEALS IN CORNWALL
In 2007/08 there were 277 appeals by parents against the non-admission of their child to their preferred primary school in Cornwall; 75 were successful. For secondary schools in Cornwall the figures are 405 and 151.

8183 children were admitted to Cornwall primary schools September 2007-January 2008 and 6514 to secondary schools in the same period.
[Department for children, families, and schools: here (scroll to table 3)]

SCHOOLTEACHERS
The number of fulltime-equivalent schoolteachers in Cornwall maintained at January 2010 was 2190 in secondary schools and 1930 in nursery and primary schools and 120 in special schools: total 4240 (including 170 unqualified teachers). There were 1490 secondary teaching assistants and other secondary support staff and 2000 primary ones. The school workforce data is here. The cost of employing teachers in Cornwall Council maintained schools for 2008-2009 was £18.87 million and for teaching assistants £4.646 million (Hansard 27 October 2010 column 364W-368W). The average teacher salary in Cornwall in £36 000 in 2009 (website above). All the figures are for fulltime-equivalent staff.

SECOND HOMES
Second homes in Cornwall (excluding Scillies) totalled 14 095 in 2010, 5.6 percent of the housing stock, based on council tax [House of Commons Library DEP2010-2186 of 6 December 2010]. In 2004 there were 13 509 second homes. The DEP data gives district totals and percentages for 2004-2008.

In terms of numbers of second homes in 2008 North Cornwall was 7th out of 354 England authorities, Penwith 15th, Carrick 24th, Caradon 26th, Restormel 30th, and Kerrier 47th. These positions represent numbers of second homes not percentages of housing stock.

The estimated cost of the second homes discount in Cornwall was £2 067 000 [Department for Communities and Local Government local authority council tax database 2011: Parliamentary Library, DEP 2012-0644, 17 April 2012]

SMOKING MOTHERS IN CORNWALL
The Health and social care information centre (HSCIC) publishes quarterly and annual statistics on the number and percentage of mothers who are smoking at the time of delivery. For 2012/13 the Cornwall percentage was 13.8, the England percentage 12.7. See here. The Cornwall and England statistics show a decline in mothers smoking at the time of delivery over the decade. In 2005/06 the Cornwall figure was 19.9 percent.

SOCIAL CLASS IN CORNWALL
The 2011 census in QS611EW, approximate social grade, gives the proportions of people in Cornwalll (aged 16-64 in households) in social groups: AB 18.3 percent, C1 28.7 percent, C2 27.2 percent, DE 25.8 percent. [2011 census, ONS]

SURE START IN CORNWALL
At the end of October 2009 there were thirty seven Sure Start Centres in Cornwall.
[ Hansard 14 December 2009 column 702W]

TEENAGE PREGNANCIES IN CORNWALL
In 2009 there were 292 conceptions to under-18 girls in Cornwall, 30.5 per 1000 girls in Cornwall aged 15-17. In England the average was 38.2 per 1000 (45.5 per 1000 in 1997 in England). [Source: Hansard 12 December 2011 column 517W which gives the data for every primary local authority]

UNEMPLOYMENT: JSA CLAIMANTS
All JSA claimants in Cornwall and Isles of Scilly. May 2014: 5522, 1.7 percent of the resident population aged 18-64 (April 2014: 6098, 1.9 percent. May 2013: 8425, 2.6 percent)[ONS Nomis].

Cornwall and Scillies youth claimant count (resident population aged 18-24). May 2014: 1475 (April 2014: 1705. May 2013: 2370)[ONS Nomis]

The 2013 contribution-based jobseekers allowance (JSA) broadly is £71.70 a week for people aged 25 and over 25 and £56.25 a week for people aged 16 to 24. The value of the income-based JSA is different. For details see here.

The jobseekers claimant count is not a measure of unemployment but of people claiming the benefit who must be, inter alia, available for work and actively seeking work.

This website gives details of jobseeker claimant counts over time for Cornwall:
https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/reports/lmp/la/1967128581/subreports/jsa_time_series/report.aspx

This website gives details of the youth claimant counts over time in Cornwall:
https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/reports/lmp/la/1967128581/subreports/jsaad_time_series/report.aspx

Claimant by constituencies is here:
<a href=”http://www.parliament.uk/briefing-papers/rp14-23/unemployment-by-constituency-april-2014

These are general labour statistics for Cornwall and Scilly:
https://www.nomisweb.co.uk/reports/lmp/la/1967128581/report.aspx

The latest labour force survey data, a measure of employment/unemployment, is for October 2011-September 2012: http://www.nomisweb.co.uk/reports/lmp/la/1967128581/subreports/ea_time_series/report.aspx

UNCOLLECTED DOMESTIC AND NON-DOMESTIC LOCAL TAXES
For 2009/10 the total of uncollected council tax in Cornwall was £5.967 million (2.5 percent of the total due) and uncollected non-domestic rates £3.635 million (2. 9 percent) [GMB union 22 July 2010]

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE FALMOUTH: SOCIO-ECONOMIC BACKGROUND OF STUDENTS
Socio-economic data about first degree students entering University College, Falmouth in 2008/09 has been published by the Higher education statistics agency (HESA). It is available at the Guardian here: Falmouth is number 35 in the second table or scroll to Download the full spreadsheet where Falmouth is number 44.

31.6 percent of the first degree Falmouth entrants were working class, that is the occupation of the senior working parent was in a routine or manual occupation (groups 4, 5, 6, and 7 in National Statistics: socio-economic classification). The mean average for all England universities was 32.4 percent. The working class made up about 37 percent of the UK population (ONS).

WATER AND SEWERAGE BILLS
The average water and sewerage bill for customers of South West Water, including people in Cornwall, is £549 in 203/14.

The average bills for the different England companies for 2009/10 to 2013/14 are given in DEP2013-1980 of 9 December 2013. All are lower than South West’s.

WIND FARM CAPACITY FACTOR IN CORNWALL 2009
The nine wind farm developments in Cornwall in 2009 had an average output of 22.37% of their capacity.
[Michael Jefferson, professor of International Business and Sustainability at the London Metropolitan Business School cited here and here.]

WORK CAPABILITY: REASSESSMENT FOR ESA
People assessed as unfit for work are being reassessed. Between October 2010 and July 2011 in England 37 percent were reassessed as fit for work and 63 percent as eligible for employment support allowance (ESA). In Cornwall (excluding the Isles of Scilly) the figures were 34 percent fit for work and 66 percent eligible for ESA. Details are given by the Department for work and pensions in an excel spreadsheet dated 20 April 2012 here.



General sources

These data and research pages on the website site of Cornwall unitary council carry very much societal data about Cornwall.

ASHE Annual survey of hours and earnings (http://www.statistics.gov.uk/statBase/product.asp?vlnk=13101)

DEP Deposited parliamentary papers (http://deposits.parliament.uk)

Hansard (http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm/cmtoday/cmdebate/home.htm)

ONS Office for National Statistics

Teachernet (http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/docbank/index.cfm?id=12222)

A useful website for understanding local government language is: http://localgovglossary.wikispaces.com/

Cornwall Council publishes a monthly report on the local and national economy:
Economy monthly monotoring update( http://www.cornwall.gov.uk/default.aspx?page 22498)

Health and welfare data for Cornwall is available from Public Health Observatories here.



The news about child poverty is grim. After four years of Tory Libdem government we now know that the 2020 targets for reducing the poverty will be missed. The Labour government made commendable progress on reducing child poverty but overall its record was patchy and disappointing; however, the current government has worsened that.

The details are set out by the Social mobility and child poverty commission in its report Understanding parental employment scenarios necessary to meet the 2020 child poverty targets (June 2014). Read it here. Note the judgement: “It is impossible to meet the absolute or relative poverty targets even with unfeasibly large increases in parental employment” (page 42). Actually, two thirds of children in poverty are in working households.

In 2010/11 the proportions of children in relative and absolute poverty were 17 percent and 20 percent. By 2020 those figures are likely to be 21 percent and 24 percent. (These are the figures before housing costs.)

The report notes that the Institute for fiscal studies (IFS) presents a worse picture of 22.5 percent and 27.9 percent: see page 67.

On the heels of the news about the child poverty targets the Trussell Trust tells us that in 2013/14 it gave emergency food aid to 330 205 children in Britain. The Trust has food banks in Cornwall at Bude, Callington, Helston, Launceston, Liskeard, Penryn, Saltash, St Austell, Truro, and Wadebridge. Other organisations have food banks elsewhere in Cornwall and Britain so the Trussell figures necessarily understate the scale and help.

The Trussell Trust, Oxfam, and Church action on poverty have put out the report Below the breadline: the relentless rise of food poverty in Britain (June 2014) which looks at poverty in detail. You can access the free report through their websites.

This poverty is scandalous, a moral and practical failure. Large tranches of our people are being left in a dismal want that distorts their present and future lives, that wastes their talent and robs them and us of their skills. We can do better than this – and the living wage of Cornwall Council and a few others here will help. Let us see what realistic and thought-out practical policies the parties come up with to mitigate and eventually erase child poverty.

Notes and previous posts
I have written several posts about child poverty: these are the most recent. Be sure to read the definition of poverty, relative and absolute, in the various reports.

More hungry people, more foodbanks 17 October 2013

Suffer little children 2 September 2013

Cornwall child poverty costs 19 July 2013

Child poverty still with us 15 June 2012

Child poverty in Cornwall 2012 22 February 2012

Child poverty up and up and up 13 October 2011

Child poverty: yesterday and tomorrow 16 May 2011

Here is the CPAG report by Rys FARTHING Local authorities and child poverty: balancing threats and opportunities (July 2013). It is also accessible from here.

Here is the 2012 report from the End Child Poverty.

Section 6.4 in Living Standards, Poverty and Inequality in the UK: 2013 (IFS) discusses child poverty over time.


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